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Helen's Mulberry Lane Farm Journal




Angel Biscuits (Made With Yeast)







Every time I have used the following angel biscuits recipe with company they have taken a copy of it home with them. I like it not only because the biscuits are so yummy, but also because the dough can be made up ahead of time and stored covered in the refrigerator for one to two weeks. Because the dough keeps so well in the refrigerator you can just bake what you need, which makes it convenient for families large or small.

You will need the following ingredients:

1 tablespoon yeast*
5 tablespoons lukewarm water
2 cups buttermilk, warmed
5 cups flour* (whole wheat or white or combination)
5 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
3 tablespoons sugar or honey
3/4 cup butter


Dissolve yeast in water and buttermilk.

In another bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, salt, baking soda and sugar. Cut in butter and add yeast.







Knead slightly and roll the dough out one half inch thick on a floured surface.







Cut biscuits out with a biscuit cutter and bake on a greased cookie sheet at 450 degrees for ten minutes; they do not have to rise before baking.

Serve warm with butter and homemade preserves. Yum!

*Both of these items can be purchased in my estore. Your purchase helps keep our small family farm in business. Thank you!


What teenage boys do with leftover biscuits!



Please, Thank You and Other Niceties

I think manners are an important part of having healthy, growing relationships with others. Without manners, relationships just don't flourish. Who wants to be around a person who is always talking with their mouth full of pizza or a person who walks right out of the room when you are talking to them?

Manners aren't that complicated. You don't need a six inch Emily Post rule book to follow when you wonder what to do at a fancy dinner. Manners are simply following the Golden Rule. "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." I don't like it when people crawl over the top of me to get to the potato chips at the other end of the table. Therefore, I shouldn't do it to others.

Ever notice that self-centered people often have very poor manners? Good manners put the other person first. A person with good manners is kind and thoughtful. They really care about the other person.

Life is about them, not me.

Scenario Jane and her Grandmother have set a date to go out for lunch and do some shopping together. Jane has marked her google calendar on her smart phone and her grandmother has penciled in the date in her Hallmark calendar. Both are excited about this special time together, especially the grandmother who is lonely and missing family.





One hour before their planned lunch/shopping Jane gets a phone call from, would you believe, this handsome, really nice guy she has been drooling over for months, named Tommy. Tommy wonders if they can get together for lunch, in one hour. Same time as her planned lunch with her Grandmother. Argghhhh!

So modern day Jane, "what do you do, dear"**......







Response 1

You (Jane) immediately accept Tommy's invite. Don't tell him you had other plans. You then call your Grandma and tell her you can't make your dinner date; that something has come up and that maybe another time you can have lunch. Grandma politely hides her disappointment and says she understands. But when Grandma gets off the phone, she sheds a tear or two, puts her coat and gloves away. Her day is now shared with loneliness and disappointment.

What does Response 1 communicate to Grandma? "Jane is too busy for me. Whatever else has come up is more important than me. Jane doesn't keep her commitments. Jane is all about Jane."

Response 2

You tell handsome Tommy that you are sorry but you already have a commitment for lunch with your Grandmother. Let him know you are free tomorrow and that you would very much like to get together with him.

What does Response 2 communicate to Grandma and to Tommy? "Jane keeps her commitments. Family is important. Jane is all about other people. Jane makes personal sacrifices for others. Jane can be counted on."







We Use This For That

I don't like plastic. It just doesn't last. It cracks. It gets dirty and you can't clean it. I know; it is all around me but when I have a choice I try to avoid it.

I've had this laundry basket problem. (Should I go to therapy for it?) What to put the wet and dirty laundry in without things getting even more smelly than they already are?

I have used Rubbermaid laundry baskets for years. Rubbermaid is about the best type of plastic out there. It does last longer than Sterilite plastic. But eventually they all end up in the dumpster; some sooner than later.

I love wicker and metal baskets of all kinds. I collect them and use them. I started putting my laundry in bushel baskets, but the wet towels and the wood just didn't like each other; more moldy smell.

I began looking for something metal, kind of like the egg baskets from long ago. That might work.







I had two of them. But they were too small. I needed them to be big enough for a full load of laundry.

I began searching online for metal bushel baskets, searching via google images. This enabled me to quickly look through the pictures without going from website to website.

This is what I came up with. Metal clam baskets sold by New England Marine!***




New England Marine



I bit the bullet and bought three to save on shipping costs. One each for whites, darks and towels. I love them! They have handles, are large and are indestructible. One could paint them, but I kind of like the rustic look. It matches my country decor.

They aren't cheap but will save money in the long run. No more moldy, smelly laundry!





Blessings,
Helen

Footnotes

** -- "What Do You Do, Dear?, by Sesyle Joslin, Pictures by Maurice Sendak. I used to read this book to my children when they were little. A great fun read with easy to understand manners.

*** --I receive no compensation for telling you about this product; not even free samples. :)

     


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